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Jurors « National Ideas Competition for the Washington Monument Grounds
Jurors

 

Stage 1 Jury

Steering Committee

James P. Clark, AIA
Architectural Competitions
Chair

Adele Ashkar, ASLA
Landscape Design
Vice Chair

Lisa Benton-Short, Ph.D.
Geography

Kenneth R. Bowling
History

Kent Cooper, FAIA
Architecture

Judy Scott Feldman, Ph.D.
National Mall History

Richard Longstreth, Ph.D.
American Studies

Kay Murphy
Development

Executive Director
Ellen Goldstein

Lead Juror: Raymond Gastil, AICP, is a City Planner and Urban Designer active in practice, education, and research on public space, waterfronts, and urban design. He is currently Director of Gastilworks Planning & Design, a consulting firm focused on urban projects. He also serves on national and local juries, panels, and planning groups, including a leadership role for the upcoming John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures, “Now Urbanism,” at the University of Washington in Fall 2010.

Gastil is the former City Planning Director for Seattle, where he led the City’s long range planning efforts for neighborhoods, center city, and citywide. Major recent initiatives included Livable South Downtown, as well as the planning and urban design for South Lake Union. He led the City’s Neighborhood Planning Update process incorporating both conventional tools for public engagement and an innovative approach to engage directly groups historically underrepresented in the planning process. This work has received the Washington State Governor’s award. Major recent sustainability efforts performance-based zoning initiatives, more “green” streets and sidewalks, and better incorporating public health into planning goals and civic engagement.

Gastil’s professional career also includes serving as Director of the Manhattan Office for the New York City Department of City Planning, where he led projects ranging from the planning of Central Harlem and West Harlem, major mixed use projects including the West Side Yards, West Chelsea/Highline, the East River waterfront, Lower East Side/East Village, and the revitalization of the World Trade Center site.

Before that, Gastil served as the founding director of Van Alen Institute: Projects in Public Architecture, where he led a groundbreaking program of ideas competitions, exhibitions, publications, and fellowships committed to improving the discourse on and realization of the transformative role of design in the public realm. Among the most significant projects were the ideas competition for Governors Island, and the competition for the new Duffy Square in Times Square now realized as the “red stairs.” He has launched major exhibitions in New York, has served on major juries and panels in Boston and Washington D.C., and served on the advisory panel of the Mayor’s Institute on City Design in 2009. Prior to his work with Van Alen, he led the Regional Design work at the Regional Plan Association, completing the Third Regional Plan for the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut metropolis/region. He also served on the advisory board for the University of Virginia School of Architecture, including serving as Chair.

Professionally trained in architecture, an educator in urban design and landscape architecture, and a professional city planner, Gastil brings an interdisciplinary approach to the issues that challenge cities today, from the role of work and leisure to the role of culture in sustaining and preserving generative urban identities. Gastil has contributed to civic discourse on critical, sensitive issues, serving as a spokesperson for the design field on the role of memorials and the process to developing them in New York after 9/11.

Gastil received his M.Arch from Princeton in 1991, and his B.A. in literature, cum laude, from Yale College in 1980.


David Hackett Fischer is the Earl Warren Professor of History at Brandeis, where he has taught since 1962. He is celebrated for a large body of work that seeks to correct errors in traditional understandings of early American history. He is the author of several noted books on history, including Bound Away: Virginia and the Westward Movement, The Great Wave: Price Movements in Modern History, Paul Revere’s Ride, and Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America. In 2004 he won a Pulitzer Prize for Washington’s Crossing, a strategic and tactical analysis of Washington’s battles in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Writing in the “New York Times Book Review,” Joseph Ellis called it, “a highly realistic and wonderfully readable narrative …. Fischer’s ability to combine the panoramic with the palpable is unparalleled in giving us a glimpse of what warfare back then was really like.”

He is the author most recently of Champlain’s Dream (2008), the authoritative biography of French adventurer and visionary, Samuel de Champlain. The book’s publication coincides with the 400th anniversary of the founding of New France in 1608. The book presents Champlain as a man of many talents and interests—soldier, spy, master mariner, explorer, cartographer, artist, and Father of New France. Other notable works include Liberty and Freedom: A Visual History of America’s Founding Ideas (2004), a main selection of the History Book Club; Historians’ Fallacies: Toward a Logic of Historical Thought (1970). He is co-editor, with James M. McPherson, of the Pivotal Moments in American History series published by Oxford University Press. In 2006, he received the Irving Kristol Prize of the American Enterprise Institute. He is presently at work on two books, a comparative political history of the United States and New Zealand, and a history of the endurance of African folkways in America. Dr. Fischer is a graduate of Princeton and Johns Hopkins Universities.


Kathryn Gustafson brings over 30 years of distinguished, international practice to Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. Kathryn’s award-winning landscapes and structures can be found throughout Europe, North America, and the Middle East. Her diverse span of prominent works, ranging from one to 500 acres in size, are known as ground-breaking, contemporary designs that intuitively incorporate the sculptural, sensual qualities that are fundamental to the human experience of landscape. Two partner offices, Gustafson Guthrie Nichol Ltd in Seattle and Gustafson Porter in London, continue to evolve the design approach of Gustafson’s work into new contexts of time, culture, and nature.

Kathryn Gustafson is an honorary fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architecture, an honorary Royal Designer for Industry, and a medalist of the French Academy of Architecture. She is the recipient of The Chrysler Design Award and of London’s Jane Drew Prize. She is active in lecturing, and her work is widely published.

Kathryn’s recent work in Washington, DC includes the Kogod Courtyard at the Smithsonian’s Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture, the new CityCenterDC development, and the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Other projects include the Lurie Garden in Chicago’s Millennium Park, Arthur Ross Terrace at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, Westergasfabriek Culture Park in Amsterdam, and the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain in London.


Sara Douglas Hart is a New York-based design journalist who has written extensively about building technology and innovation for many publications, including Architectural Record, GreenSource, The Architect’s Newspaper, Architect, Oculus, Yale University Constructs, and Metropolis.

After serving as senior editor at Architectural Record for six years, Hart left to pursue a broader range of architectural projects. She curated the Innovate:Integrate exhibition at the AIANY Center for Architecture on view until January 15. The exhibition showcases the finalists of the AIA New York Chapter’s "Open Call for Innovative Curtain-Wall Design" alongside a selection of projects that demonstrate the latest construction methodologies, including material performance, energy harvesting, and daylight optimization.

Her recent essay about renowned light artist Leo Villareal is included in a monograph published in conjunction with the artist’s solo exhibition this Fall at the San Jose Museum of Art. In it she discusses how Villareal’s large-scale light sculptures influence the way architecture is perceived.

She wrote two essays and contributed to the production of Architecture: Celebrating the Past, Designing the Future, a comprehensive and critical work commemorating the American Institute of Architecture’s 150th anniversary (2007). She is also the author of several monographs about prominent architectural firms.

Sara Hart received a Master of Architecture degree from Columbia University in 1984.


Mitchell Joachim is a leader in ecological design and urbanism and an Associate Professor at New York University. He specializes in adapting physical and social ecological principles to architecture, urban design, transport, and environmental planning. His work has revolutionized urban architecture.

Joachim is envisioning the future of architecture and its relationship to humanity and the global ecological system. Much of his work revolves around solving the problems of global warming and urban growth. His work has involved such initiatives as creating the car of the future and re-conceptualizing the city — from infrastructure and mobility systems to designing vehicles, cars, trains and public housing. His architectural acts are admittedly activist and “socio-ecological” in that they incorporate social justice and ecological science.

Mitchell Joachim is a Co-Founder of Terreform ONE and Terrefuge in Brooklyn, NY. Terreform is a Brooklyn based non-profit group that re-imagines New York City as an ecological sustainable community. The group develops innovative solutions and technologies for local sustainability in energy, transportation, infrastructure, buildings, waste treatment, food, water, and media spaces. Terreform ONE won the Zumtobel Group Award for Sustainability and Humanity in the Built Environment

Mitchell Joachim was the Frank Gehry International Visiting Chair at the University of Toronto for 2009-2010. He was also on faculty at Syracuse University, Columbia University, Parsons, and The New School of Design.

Joachim earned a Ph.D. at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MAUD Harvard University, M.Arch at Columbia University, and BPS SUNY at Buffalo with Honors. He has been awarded fellowships at TED2010, Moshe Safdie Assoc., and Martin Society for Sustainability at MIT.

He won the History Channel and Infiniti Excellence Award for the City of the Future and Time Magazine’s Best Invention of 2007, Compacted Car w/ MIT Smart Cities. His project, Fab Tree Hab, has been exhibited at MoMA and widely published.

Joachim’s work has gained him an international audience and he has appeared on The Colbert Report, Discovery Channel, and various other radio and television programs. He was chosen by Wired magazine for "The 2008 Smart List: 15 People the Next President Should Listen To." Rolling Stone magazine honored Mitchell as an agent of change in "The 100 People Who Are Changing America." Popular Science magazine has featured his work as a visionary for “The Future of the Environment” in 2010.


Kirk Savage is professor and department chair, History of Art and Architecture, at the University of Pittsburgh, and an award-winning historian and scholar of the National Mall. Dr. Savage first became interested public monuments, and more broadly, art in the public sphere, in his undergraduate days in the 1970s, because he believed that here art seemed to connect with the “real world” of politics and power. In the early 1980s he wrote essays on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, then newly built, and on the early history of the Washington Monument. The book that emerged from this work, Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War, and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America (Princeton, 1997) focused on the racial formation of public remembrance and public monuments, and how notions of selfhood and citizenship were put to the test in the medium of the public monument.

His work on slavery and its representation in public monuments made him interested more generally in issues of traumatic memory, and memorials that emerged from tragedies and war such as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the Oklahoma City National Memorial, and the World Trade Center competition.

More recently he has focused on the more encompassing notion of landscape, conceived aesthetically, politically, psychologically, and ecologically. His current book, Monument Wars: Washington, D.C., the National Mall, and the Transformation of the Memorial Landscape, published in 2009 by the University of California Press, reconsiders the key public monuments and spaces of the capital within a narrative of nation building, spatial conquest, ecological destructiveness, and psychological trauma. For this work, the Smithsonian American Art Museum awarded Dr. Savage the 2010 Charles C. Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art.

Savage earned a doctorate degree from University of California, Berkeley in 1990.


Joy Zinoman has been the acclaimed Founding Artistic Director of The Studio Theatre in Washington, DC. She has been teaching and directing for 50 years in the U.S. and abroad. Under her leadership, The Studio Theatre – where she has directed 70 productions – has received 225 Helen Hayes Awards nominations. She recently received the inaugural Mayor’s Art Award for Visionary Leadership. She received the 2005 Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Director for A Number by Carol Churchill. In 2005, she also received The Washington Post Award for Innovative Leadership in the Theatre Community. She received the 2000 Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Director for Indian Ink by Tom Stoppard, which also received the Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Resident Production. Zinoman has received nine additional Helen Hayes Award nominations for Outstanding Direction. In addition, as Director of the Acting Conservatory and creator of its core curriculum, Joy has guided its development for the past 35 years.

Zinoman is revered for both her artistic work on stage, and more broadly for her work in the D.C. community through the presence and success of The Studio Theatre and the transformation it brought in a run-down section of town devastated after the riots following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Sidewalks long littered with trash and needles now have signs for high-end condominiums, and new restaurants and galleries. Much of the credit for the transformation is due to the Studio Theatre, which began 32 years ago in rented space on 14th Street. From there, Studio moved twice within the neighborhood. This gradually led to Zinoman’s boldest move, the purchasing of three adjacent buildings on 14th and P Street, building a complex that includes four new theaters, classrooms and rehearsal space, state-of-the-art costume and scenery shops, as well as public spaces under a glass atrium uniting the buildings.

Zinoman has developed a model for keeping an independent theater afloat that is now being studied around the country. Her vision and innovative management enables Studio to offer education programs free to children in need–an important service to a neighborhood where halfway houses and boutiques are neighbors. Through grit and drama, Joy Zinoman and the Studio have brought new life to both her stages and the street.

Zinoman credits longtime colleagues with much of Studio’s success but it is the spirit of Zinoman, described by Variety as "the irrespressible maestro," that pervades the place. Whether she’s teaching a class or climbing through the rubble of what eventually became her new theater, she stays passionately engaged in the work and is ever bursting with excitement.

Joy Zinoman attended Northwestern University, Radcliffe College and American University.

 

 

Stage 2 Jury

 

Lead Juror: Gregory K. Hunt, FAIA, is the Founding Dean of the new School of Architecture at Marywood University in Scranton, Pennsylvania. The School, which opened in fall 2009, is the first school of architecture established in Northeast Pennsylvania.

From 2003 until 2008, Mr. Hunt served as Vice Chairman and Director of Design at Leo A. Daly, an international planning, architecture, engineering and interior design firm. Prior to joining this firm, he was an architectural educator for over 25 years at both Virginia Tech and The Catholic University of America, serving as Dean of the School of Architecture and Planning at CUA from 1996 to 2003.

Mr. Hunt is also a past President of the Virginia Society AIA, has served on many local and regional AIA committees, has lectured nationally and internationally, and is the author of several articles and book chapters on architecture and design.

Mr. Hunt was elected to the prestigious College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 2000 in recognition of his joint contributions and service both to education and the profession.

On November 6th of 2009, Mr. Hunt was named the 2009 William C. Noland Medalist by the Virginia Society AIA, the highest honor bestowed upon a member of the Society. “The award recognizes architects who have established a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, which spans a broad spectrum of the profession and transcends the scope of normal professional activities.”


David Hackett Fischer is the Earl Warren Professor of History at Brandeis, where he has taught since 1962. He is celebrated for a large body of work that seeks to correct errors in traditional understandings of early American history. He is the author of several noted books on history, including Bound Away: Virginia and the Westward Movement, The Great Wave: Price Movements in Modern History, Paul Revere’s Ride, and Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America. In 2004 he won a Pulitzer Prize for Washington’s Crossing, a strategic and tactical analysis of Washington’s battles in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Writing in the “New York Times Book Review,” Joseph Ellis called it, “a highly realistic and wonderfully readable narrative …. Fischer’s ability to combine the panoramic with the palpable is unparalleled in giving us a glimpse of what warfare back then was really like.”

He is the author most recently of Champlain’s Dream (2008), the authoritative biography of French adventurer and visionary, Samuel de Champlain. The book’s publication coincides with the 400th anniversary of the founding of New France in 1608. The book presents Champlain as a man of many talents and interests—soldier, spy, master mariner, explorer, cartographer, artist, and Father of New France. Other notable works include Liberty and Freedom: A Visual History of America’s Founding Ideas (2004), a main selection of the History Book Club; Historians’ Fallacies: Toward a Logic of Historical Thought (1970). He is co-editor, with James M. McPherson, of the Pivotal Moments in American History series published by Oxford University Press. In 2006, he received the Irving Kristol Prize of the American Enterprise Institute. He is presently at work on two books, a comparative political history of the United States and New Zealand, and a history of the endurance of African folkways in America. Dr. Fischer is a graduate of Princeton and Johns Hopkins Universities.


Benjamin Forgey, is an independent architecture critic. For 25 years he authored the weekly Cityscape column for The Washington Post in addition to news reports, occasional essays, protests and art reviews. In subject matter these columns and essays ranged broadly over the spectrum of design disciplines. Architecture was a primary focus, but painting, sculpture, public art, historic preservation, urban design and urban planning issues were engaged on a regular basis. One of the first Cityscape columns attempted to refocus public attention on the McMillan plan while several of the last columns comprised a series on the Anacostia Waterfront plan. During this time he also traveled extensively, seeking out innovative and public-spirited architectural and planning initiatives in Europe, Asia and throughout the United States.

In 1993 Mr. Forgey received an AIA Institute Citation Honor: “The Nation and its capital city are richer for his dedication to and insistence upon quality over expediency in our buildings and environment. Gracefully yet forcefully, directly yet pensively, he brings an acute perspective to the built environment, and the results are greater public awareness and, ultimately, a better world in which to live.”

He was awarded the first Award for Cultural Journalism by the American Society of Newspaper Editors in 2004. In 2006, the Washington Chapter of the American Institute of Architects bestowed the Glenn Brown Award in recognition of his contributions to raise public awareness of the built environment and its benefits to society.


Eric D. Groft, ASLA, is a landscape architect renowned for his diversity in residential, commercial and institutional work. His frequently published design accomplishments include residential rooftop terraces, oceanfront estates, historic properties and a 3,500-acre nature preserve on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Mr. Groft’s federal work includes landscape design and perimeter security for the Federal Reserve Campus in Washington, DC, the US Embassy in Barbados, and the plantings of the German American Friendship Garden on the National Mall as well as Pennsylvania Avenue.

Mr. Groft is widely recognized as an industry leader in environmental/wetland restoration, and shoreline stabilization/revetment. He frequently lectures on these topics and the work of his firm Oehme van Sweden.


Joy Zinoman has been the acclaimed Founding Artistic Director of The Studio Theatre in Washington, DC. She has been teaching and directing for 50 years in the U.S. and abroad. Under her leadership, The Studio Theatre – where she has directed 70 productions – has received 225 Helen Hayes Awards nominations. She recently received the inaugural Mayor’s Art Award for Visionary Leadership. She received the 2005 Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Director for A Number by Carol Churchill. In 2005, she also received The Washington Post Award for Innovative Leadership in the Theatre Community. She received the 2000 Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Director for Indian Ink by Tom Stoppard, which also received the Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Resident Production. Zinoman has received nine additional Helen Hayes Award nominations for Outstanding Direction. In addition, as Director of the Acting Conservatory and creator of its core curriculum, Joy has guided its development for the past 35 years.

Zinoman is revered for both her artistic work on stage, and more broadly for her work in the D.C. community through the presence and success of The Studio Theatre and the transformation it brought in a run-down section of town devastated after the riots following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Sidewalks long littered with trash and needles now have signs for high-end condominiums, and new restaurants and galleries. Much of the credit for the transformation is due to the Studio Theatre, which began 32 years ago in rented space on 14th Street. From there, Studio moved twice within the neighborhood. This gradually led to Zinoman’s boldest move, the purchasing of three adjacent buildings on 14th and P Street, building a complex that includes four new theaters, classrooms and rehearsal space, state-of-the-art costume and scenery shops, as well as public spaces under a glass atrium uniting the buildings.

Zinoman has developed a model for keeping an independent theater afloat that is now being studied around the country. Her vision and innovative management enables Studio to offer education programs free to children in need–an important service to a neighborhood where halfway houses and boutiques are neighbors. Through grit and drama, Joy Zinoman and the Studio have brought new life to both her stages and the street.

Zinoman credits longtime colleagues with much of Studio’s success but it is the spirit of Zinoman, described by Variety as "the irrespressible maestro," that pervades the place. Whether she’s teaching a class or climbing through the rubble of what eventually became her new theater, she stays passionately engaged in the work and is ever bursting with excitement.

Joy Zinoman attended Northwestern University, Radcliffe College and American University.